Gulf Coast Conference – 2021 Posters

See below for a list of our GCC 2021 posters!

#102

View Poster
Here

Automatic Transmission Fluids: What does the future hold for them?

Automatic transmission fluids (ATF) are ubiquitously used for decades and is salient in optimizing a vehicle’s transmission. Internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles incorporate various transmissions, each with distinctive systems and dedicated fluids. Due to a significant ICE contribute to greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are elevating environmental standards and becoming increasingly stringent. With an increase in pressure for an eco-friendly environment, there are growing incentives for hybrid and all electric vehicles. Specifically, China and the US are two major frontrunners in this novel field and will continue developing. In this paper, we will discuss the future and practicality of ATFs in respect to a growing trend towards electric vehicles.

 
#118

View Poster
Here

Measuring Apparent Viscosity at High-Temperature and High-Shear Rate (HTHS) by Multicell Capillary Viscometer

Apparent Viscosity a tHigh-Temperature High-Shear Rate (HTHS) is a viscosity measurement of engine oils using nitrogen gas to pressurize multicell capillaries at 150 C. The measured flow time of the oil and the pressure is used to compute itsviscosity and shear rate. This method is salient in various applications, especially in heavy duty engines where the oil undergoes harsh conditions. These specifications are of paramount importance for safety and optimal performance. Lowering HTHS viscosity ostensibly conforms more towards stringent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In this poster, we will demonstrate the basic principles and functions of the novel HTHS instrument and discuss its importance.

 
#119

View Poster
Here

Vapor Pressure Measurement Technology: Analysis of the effects of Temperature on Vapor Pressure for Various Oil Samples

Vapor pressure is a crucial measurement in the fuel industry. Failure to account for the vapor pressure of a sample can lead to accidents that damage the environment and the health of others. In an attempt to regulate toxic vapors released into the air, some governments regulate the vapor pressure of petroleum products. A prime example of this is that the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) restricts the Reid vapor pressure of commercial gasoline to be lower than 7.0, 7.8, or 9.0 psi depending on the region during the summer months, and this shows that devices to quickly and easily measure the vapor pressure of fuels is a necessity in the industry. ASTM D6378, developed in 1999, uses a revolutionary method for measuring the vapor pressure of petroleum products and only requires about 10 mL of sample, as opposed to the upwards of 700 mL required for the Reid Vapor method. In this poster, we study the development of vapor pressure measurement from Reid up to the triple expansion method. We evaluate several samples provided by the various customers and investigate the efficiency and sustainability of a modern vapor pressure instrument that only requires a fractional amount of sample compared to its predecessor.

 
#126

View Poster
Here

Design & Development of a New Innovative Test Method to Quantify Tackiness on a Wider Range of Greases

Greases are utilized in a wide range of applications to increase equipment efficiency or protect the components from friction and wear. Ensuring that adequate quantities of grease remain adhered to motile parts is critical to maintain performance and integrity. Determining grease tackiness which is, a measure of the adhesive properties of a grease sample, can provide crucial information about the compatibility of a certain grease with a specific task. Adhesive properties are the result of the high-weight polymers that greases are comprised of. Currently, the most common method of testing a grease’s tackiness is to use the finger test. The finger test is a qualitative test in which the tester places an unspecified amount of sample between their thumb and index finger and pulls them apart to determine if a grease is of low, moderate, or high tackiness. In this poster, we discuss the development of a new instrument and procedure analogous to the finger test, but with quantitative results. The principle of pulling apart grease with one’s fingers is standardized with two metal plates that can accurately measure the force exerted to separate the sample. We have run tests on numerous grease samples with our new instrument in an attempt to generate a new test procedure along with repeatability and reproducibility for this refined and unique technique.

 
#127

View Poster
Here

Determination of the Flow Pressure Measurement of Semi-solid Materials in Low Temperature Environments

Greases are utilized in a wide range of applications to increase equipment efficiency or protect the components from friction and wear. Ensuring that adequate quantities of grease remain adhered to motile parts is critical to maintain performance and integrity. Determining grease tackiness which is, a measure of the adhesive properties of a grease sample, can provide crucial information about the compatibility of a certain grease with a specific task. Adhesive properties are the result of the high-weight polymers that greases are comprised of. Currently, the most common method of testing a grease’s tackiness is to use the finger test. The finger test is a qualitative test in which the tester places an unspecified amount of sample between their thumb and index finger and pulls them apart to determine if a grease is of low, moderate, or high tackiness. In this poster, we discuss the development of a new instrument and procedure analogous to the finger test, but with quantitative results. The principle of pulling apart grease with one’s fingers is standardized with two metal plates that can accurately measure the force exerted to separate the sample. We have run tests on numerous grease samples with our new instrument in an attempt to generate a new test procedure along with repeatability and reproducibility for this refined and unique technique.

 
#128

View Poster
Here

What’s in Your Fuel? A Crash Course on the Various Additives Used in 2020 and How They Have Changed

There are an estimated 150,000 gas stations in the US and about 378 million gallons of gasoline are used daily in the United States. Despite this staggering number, most Americans do not know what’s in their gasoline. Modern motor gasoline is more than the low-boiling components obtained during refining of the crude oil, like most people believe. Motor gasoline is a complex formulation that in addition to containing the low-boiling hydrocarbons contains stabilizers, octane boosters, detergents, anti-freeze agents, and a multitude of other substances tailored to increase fuel efficiency, decrease harmful emissions, and maximize the functionality of the vehicles they fuel. These substances are referred to as additives and every major producer of gasoline has its own version of an ideal additives package. This poster will explain several types of fuel additives and how they have changed and will explore the direction the fuel additives industry is moving towards in the coming years.

 
#130

View Poster
Here

The Science Behind Viscosity Measurements at High Temperature and High Shear

Viscosity is a critical property of engine lubricants that can greatly affect the performance and lifespan of the engine. However, at high temperature and pressure conditions, the viscosities of these engine lubricants vary from the standard observed under normal conditions. As a result, it is vital to understand firsthand what properties the lubricants will exhibit at high temperature and high shear (HTHS) conditions. Engine oils are frequently subjected to temperatures of 150℃ with varying pressures that depend on the grading of the lubricant. Despite these conditions, there is limited understanding of the HTHS instrument available that can test motor oils readily and effectively. In this poster, the main focus will be to describe the theory of high shear and high temperature effects towards various lubricating oils. We will also focus on the design and construction from a theoretical viewpoint of an apparatus to subject engine oils to high shear under various temperature conditions. Our study will focus on understanding the fundamentals of the changes that increased temperature and shear puts on various lubricating oils.

 
#133

View Poster
Here

Evaluation of Extreme Pressure and Anti-Wear Properties Using a Translatory Oscillation Tribometer (SRV®) to Screen Gear Oils for Scuffing Loading Testing

Gear oils are a category of high viscosity lubricants primarily used for transmissions and differentials in automobiles or other industrial machinery. It is common practice for gear lubricants to contain various additives to enhance their load-carrying capacity and performance in specific applications. In particular, machinery operating under heavy load, slow speed conditions often require anti scuff gear lubricants or extreme pressure (EP) lubricants to provide protection against adhesive and frictional wear. The Translatory Oscillation Tribometer (SRV®) is an invaluable instrument for evaluating friction and wear properties which can be applied to EP and anti-wear (AW) testing of gear oils. EP and AW tests are conducted on a translatory oscillation tester equipped for parallel movement, following the methodology of DIN 51834-4. The results are able to characterize and differentiate gear oils based on their EP and AW properties, which can serve as a pre-screener to determine which oils should go on for further bench tests and field use. This allows the SRV® Tribometer to function as a tool to screen gear oils and narrow down which gear oils should undergo expensive and time-consuming tests, such as the FZG standard scuffing loading test, which measures the scuffing load capacity of lubricants as per ISO 14635. In addition to pre-screening gear oils, the SRV® Tribometer is capable of yielding results for the coefficient of friction, wear volume and estimations for the load carrying capacity. This poster will show how the tests were developed, how the results compare to the FZG scuffing load test and how the SRV® Tribometer can be used to provide a meaningful evaluation of gear oils.

 
#134

View Poster
Here

Development of Application-Oriented Friction and Wear Tests for Industrial Greases

The use of semi-solid lubricants is integral in the effort to protect against the frictional wear and scuffing between contacting surfaces in relative motion. The wide range of lubricating grease properties and their respective applications necessitates the diversification of existing screening methods. Established test methods and standards for lubricants can serve as the basis for screening greases based on their chemical properties, but has limited carry over to determining the behavior of greases in real-life operating conditions. The Translatory Oscillation Tribometer (SRV®) is a newly developed instrument that can conduct tests according to established test methods and standards, as well as application-oriented testing procedures, which can be used for evaluating friction, wear, and extreme pressure properties of lubricating greases. This poster will highlight application-oriented friction and wear tests through test scenarios involving the effect of wear particles on the lubricity of a lubricating grease, high temperature fretting behavior of industrial greases, and the simplified examination of rolling/sliding friction of high performance greases that can be used as a FE8/FE9 rolling bearing pre-screening test.

 
#135

View Poster
Here

Overcoming the Detrimental Effects of Inorganic Salts in Crude Oil

Crude oils are complex mixtures that consist of a wide range of naturally occurring hydrocarbons that may differ in appearance, composition, consistency, and color. These oils are uniquely classified by hydrocarbon composition, distillation, yield, quality, sulfur content, or API gravity. However, crude oils often contain several compounds and impurities that need to be removed during the refining process. These include sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen compounds, trace metals, and inorganic salts. In particular, inorganic salts within raw crude can cause fouling and plugging of pipelines and heat exchangers. Additional damage can result from serious hydrochloric acid and ammonium chloride corrosion from the decomposition of chloride salts. This leads to substantial economic loss due to increased capital expenditure to repair or replace equipment. Production down-time during maintenance periods and energy inefficiency can reduce yield and further decrease profits. The wide range of problems caused by excess salt content in crude oil necessitates the measurement and removal of inorganic salts to meet industry standards. The Koehler K23060 Salt in Crude Analyzer is a newly developed instrument that can determine salt concentration in a crude oil sample conforming to the ASTM D3230 method in a quick and reliable manner to prevent complications with equipment or yield during the refinery process. This poster will primarily focus on the hazardous effects of inorganic salts during the petroleum refinery and transportation processes and how the K23060 Salt in Crude Analyzer can be used to determine excess salt concentration for crude oil desalting.

 
#138

View Poster
Here

Gas-to-Liquids: Time is of the Essence

Gas-to-liquids (GTL) process is surfacing as a popular and viable method for producing liquid fuels with the current surplus of natural gas fields in the U.S. Compared to liquid fuels produced from crude oil, GTL fuels are superior in environmental friendliness and quality which is of paramount importance in today’s stringent environmental regulations. The problem lies in the unpredictability of available natural gas fields for upcoming years. Currently, small GTL plants are advantageous in every facet for exploiting stranded gas compared to large GTL plants which require heavy investments and large productions to be profitable. In this paper, we will dive into the current and future states of GTL and determine whether it is plausible for this process to be a viable and profitable alternative to crude oil.

 
#141

View Poster
Here

Nanotechnology Innovations Aid the Lubricants and Grease Industry

The lubricants industry is a part of a growing movement in the manufacturing world to adopt the use of nanotechnology in their products. Nanoparticle additives in lubricants have long been shown to drastically improve a variety of physical and chemical properties, in both the lubricant itself and in the contact surface to which the lubricant is applied. This poster stands to be a comprehensive literature review that will take a close look into the potential for use of nanomaterials in various lubricating oils. To be more specific, two key research papers will be primarily used to analyze the anti-wear and friction-reducing tribological properties of nanoparticle additives in a water-based solvent. Furthermore, this poster will present modern developments in oil formulations, the mechanisms by which nanoparticle additives interact with contact surfaces, and a comparison of the many different types of nanoparticle constituents.

 
#142

View Poster
Here

Cloud and Pour Point Testing: Innovative Automatic Instrument Development That Can Serve as an Effective Alternative to Referee Methods

Many petroleum products are exposed to a wide range of operating temperatures, and these products must perform effectively at all temperatures. When looking for optimal performance, top quality fuels and lubricants are necessary. The term “cold flow properties” is commonly used when discussing and characterizing the behavior of petroleum products at low temperature. Some of these properties include the cloud point, pour point, freezing point, and cold filter plugging point. Operation at temperatures near or below the cloud and pour points may result in damage to equipment, so these properties are commonly used as a measure of the lowest temperature for a product’s utility. Therefore, it is paramount for the cloud and pour point to be clear so that these suboptimal conditions can be avoided during operation.

 
#144

View Poster
Here

The Applicability and Efficiency of a Tribo-Corrosion Cell Integrated in a SRV® Tribometer

Although the presence of tribo-corrosion has been known for a while, its focus and interests are still on the rise. Corrosion and tribology are both surface properties and are linked via tribocorrosion and form an intersection. In particular, the development, implication, and application of a tribo-corrosion cell for the SRV â tribometer has been of great interest. Methods for identifying the tribo-corrosive properties can be achieved through electrochemical means. Such an integration has the potential for enhanced material and chemical testing, such as electrical fields and defined currents (arcing) in tribocontacts. The design features include oscillating motion, and electrically isolated cell, electrical contact resistance and flow conductive electrolytes. The usage of a tribo-corrosion cell is vital in that this information can assist in determining the impact of electrical fields and currents through tribological contacts on the tribo-logical profile and aging of oils and greases. Often-times the mechanical stress of a system is under-stood, but not in combination with electrochemical stresses and became now measureable.

 
#149

View Poster
Here

The Current Role of Biofuels in the Modern Fuel Market and the Future Development of Advanced Biofuels

With escalating sustainability efforts in the modern fuel market, there is an increasing incentive to transition from fossil fuels to biofuels, which are an alternative fuel option produced from renewable plant-based organic matter. There are two types of biofuels that are currently in growing use: bioethanol and biodiesel. Both types of biofuels have their respective advantages and disadvantages. Bioethanol is readily in use for most vehicles in low alcohol-gasoline blends and contributes to lessening environmentally harmful tailpipe emissions. However, bioethanol blends with higher ethanol content are limited to usage in flexible fuel vehicles. Biodiesels play a significant role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions and improving engine performance, but at the cost of raising potential issues in cold weather, reactivity with engine components, and clogging of fuel filters with dissolved sediments. The United States and Brazil produce a majority of the global supply of biofuels from soybeans, corn, and sugarcane. With the market’s expected growth, this creates a conflict of whether to allocate these crops to food or fuel. This is the reasoning behind research into second-generation biofuels derived from non-edible renewable sources such as switchgrass and algae. This poster will explore these potentially new sources of biofuels and their practicality in production, effectiveness, and sustainability compared to traditional biofuel feedstock.

 
#150

View Poster
Here

Reduction of Fouling Due to Heat-Induced Deposition and Coking Using Automated Flocculation Titrimetry

Heat-induced deposition and coke formation results in fouling which leads to down time and economic loss. If severe pyrolysis occurs, the intermediate polarity material is ruined. This can result in both heat-induced deposition and coking. The common prevention measure is halting distillation early enough so that coke doesn’t form. This lack of an indicator results in premature cessation which is inefficient. A proper index of pyrolytic processes can be established using the Automated Flocculation Titrimeter (AFT). The AFT performs Heithaus titration based on ASTM D 6307. The instrument accurately predicts the compatibility of asphalts, petroleum residues, and heavy oils. The parameters set forth by the results provide the basis for the process’s retention time. Western Research Institute established the WRI Coking Index, allowing the danger of pyrolysis to be measured. The WRI index is used to indicate the proximity to coke formation. The prevention of undesirable coke and heat-induced deposition minimizes fouling and increases efficiency. The poster discusses the applications of the AFT instrument for diminishing fouling caused by heat-induced deposition and coke formation.

 
#151

View Poster
Here

The Progression of Modern Global Engine Oil Standards to Satisfy Fuel Economy Requirements and Emission Regulations

Since the emergence of the automotive industry, engine oil has proven essential in the lubrication of automobile engines. Engine oils have a wide range of usages, ranging from decreasing friction between moving parts, reducing wear, transferring heat, and minimizing energy loss in combustion engines. The addition of complex and advanced additives is often necessary in engine oil formulations to attain maximum engine performance. At the same time, engine oils must bolster fuel economy and limit harmful tailpipe emissions. Engine oils must be carefully developed and categorized in accordance with standards set by organizations around the world. However, the presence of countless organizations with similar test methods reveals the issue of translating results across international markets. In 2019, the Global Lubricants Test Standards Collaboration Team was formed to conceptualize existing standards, with the intent to reduce redundancy and promote technological advancement. The United States, Europe, Canada, India, as well as China, adapt ever-changing standards based on environmental, market, and technological influences. Each country implements standards that pertain to their domestic markets and distinct driving conditions. In this poster, modern engine oil standards, along with test methods, will be analyzed domestically and compared on an international scale to facilitate global progress as the automotive industry continues to evolve.

 
#152

View Poster
Here

The Current State of the Fuel Additives Market and Future Projections of Growth

Fuel additives are chemical compounds that enhance the quality and performance of fuels. We can label them into three different categories: performance additives, distribution additives, and fuel quality additives. Performance additives, as the name suggests, improves the performance of the engine. For example, carburetor icing is caused by the decrease in temperature from evaporating gasoline. Anti-icing agents are included to prevent icing from occurring and enhance airflow. Fuel additives can also improve lubricity, combustion efficiency, and reduce unwanted emissions. Distribution additives are more focused on protecting fuels during transportation and distribution. They can be used to improve flow, prevent corrosion, or be as simple as add color to the fuel to differentiate the product. Lastly, fuel quality additives focus on maintaining the quality of the fuel during storage and preventing degradation. Oxidation inhibitors for example, improve the long-term fuel storage stability by preventing the formation of peroxides and gums. The fuel additives market is expected to see a growth in the upcoming years due to the stricter regulation by the SAFE Vehicle Rule, stricter emission limits, ULSD fuel improvements, and the reopening of the country after the pandemic. Although the electric vehicle industry is a direct competitor to the fuel car industry, fuel and oil still dominate the market when it comes to the number of units sold and remains the primary fuel source for energy in the transportation sector.

 
#153

View Poster
Here

The Role of Lubrication and Tribology in the Advancement of Sustainability

Tribology has a major impact on sustainability in many different fields in varying ways. In order to reduce wear in machines and increase their lifetime, the friction between the parts of the machinery can be reduced, and as a result minimizes greenhouse gas emissions and increases machine efficiency. As machines get more efficient and last longer, they require less maintenance and waste less energy. Tribology has the potential to greatly improve different fields, such as wind power generation and electric vehicles, leading to increased sustainability. Wind power is one of the best options for minimizing greenhouse gas emissions and by utilizing tribology, wind turbines can be made more effective and economical. This allows for it to become a more reliable source of power. Due to this, electric vehicles become a more environmentally friendly option since they would be powered by renewable energy, such as wind or solar power. The field of tribology would make the vehicles themselves more efficient as well as increase the potential of the vehicle’s batteries. On top of these benefits, using natural or biodegradable lubricants, which have the potential to be even better than synthetic lubricants, would make wind power generation and electric vehicles even more sustainable and environmentally friendly. This poster will go further into detail about how bio-lubricants, wind power, electric vehicles, and various other fields are benefited by tribology and lead to a more sustainable future.

 
#154

View Poster
Here

Investigating the Detrimental Effects of Escalating Carbon Emissions and the Future Approaches to Minimize Gaseous CO2

The burning of fossil fuels has been the leading contributor to the rise of global carbon emissions, which is the primary driver of global climate change. Human activities, especially industrial emissions, have generated a detrimental impact on the environment, causing major climate issues, such as air pollution, global warming, and biodiversity deterioration. Global temperatures have increased extensively, and the range of harm has led to ecological, physical, and health problems, and extreme weather events, such as floods, droughts, heatwaves, and storms. Many scientists and engineers have been working to minimize CO2 emissions by limiting the use of petroleum products and exploring alternative sources of energy. In the effort to transition away from fossil fuels, new technologies and energy sources have been pursued, which have less adverse environmental effects and demonstrate superb energy efficiency. Solar energy and nuclear energy are alternative energy sources that have shown substantial potential in replacing fossil fuels for the pursuit of renewable and sustainable energy production. In this poster, the negative impacts of carbon emissions and the potential strategies for reducing carbon emissions will be discussed.

 
#156

View Poster
Here

Development of a Closed-Cup Pensky-Martens Test to Numerically Determine the Flash Point of Flammable Liquids

The flash point of an organic liquid is defined as the lowest temperature at which the vapors formed above the liquid will briefly ignite in close proximity to an ignition source. Determination of the flash point is crucial to ensuring safety in the petroleum industry when considering the proper environment for the storage and transportation volatile substances. Regarding oils, a comparison between the baseline flash point of an oil and the flash point of a separate sample of the oil can be utilized for a variety of analyses, such as changes in oil chemistry (oil cracking), additions to the oil (oil contamination), or subtractions from the oil (thermal evaporation). The primary testing methods for flash point determination are classified as either open or closed cup tests. Since the measured value for the flash point can vary depending on the distance from the ignition source, closed cup tests are typically preferred, as the resultant flash points will typically be lower, erring on the side of caution. The K71000 Automatic PMCC Flash Point Analyzer manufactured by Koehler Instrument Company, Inc. is a fully automatic flash point tester that can determine the flash points of flammable substances via the Pensky-Martens Closed Cup Test, as specified in ASTM D93.

 
#157

View Poster
Here

Assessing Low Temperature Characteristics of Fuels Through Cloud and Pour Point Determination

Determining the cloud point and pour point of petroleum products is pivotal to assessing the proper temperatures for the storage and use of fuels and lubricants. When petroleum is used under low temperature conditions, flow characteristics and functionality can be compromised. When a fuel approaches its cloud point, it begins to develop a cloudy appearance, which is caused by the crystallization of solidified wax. Similarly, the pour point of fuel refers to the temperature at which the fuel loses its flow characteristics and ceases to flow. The improper use of fuels in non-operable temperature ranges can lead to system failure and costly consequences. The K77000 Automatic Cloud and Pour Point Analyzer provides an efficient and accurate method for cloud point and pour point determination in a single unit. These low temperature characteristics are crucial for evaluating which petroleum derived products can maintain proper function under extreme cold conditions. Additives can be used to supplement the cold weather operability of fuels and lubricants that are susceptible to low temperatures. This poster will highlight the advantages of the K77000 Automatic Cloud and Pour Point Analyzer and discuss the potential solutions to using petroleum at low temperatures.

 
#158

View Poster
Here

Solar Power: Perspective on Renewable Energy for Electric Vehicles

Greenhouse gas emissions by the burning of fossil fuels has represented a major issue in the modern world. Serious health problems caused by pollution and the devastating impact on the world’s ecosystem and economy make the development of clean energy extremely urgent. The transportation sector, in particular, accounts for 28% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, new automotive technology is required to mitigate the exponential trend of pollution. The rise of the electric vehicle (EV) industry is undoubtedly a significant step towards a greener future. Moreover, solar energy represents one of the most popular renewable and clean energy sources in recent years, as new kinds of solar-powered electric vehicles and innovative charging stations are gradually paving their way into the EV industry. Compared to conventional EVs, solar-powered electric vehicles (SPEVs) have no internal combustion engine, clutch, and gearbox, but are made up of panels, storage appliances, and electromotors, which can convert solar energy directly into electricity. Therefore, an increase in the share of SPEVs can effectively improve the integration of renewable energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The two main methods of solar energy charging are direct charging through photovoltaic (PV) panels mounted on the roof of the automobile and through a solar-powered charging station. In this poster, we discuss the disadvantages of the two approaches in detail, possible ways to improve performance, and the prospect of future development in integrating solar power into the EV industry.

 
#159

View Poster
Here

Evaluation of the Characteristics of Modern Lubricants for Electric Vehicles

The rising popularity of electric vehicles (EVs) and electrified drivelines has increased the demand for developing specialized lubricants. These dedicated lubricants must possess characteristics that optimize EV performance, such as the ability to reduce noise, maintain compatibility with electrical components, and maximize efficiency. The lubricants should also reduce corrosion, improve the vehicle’s electrical properties, and have an appropriate viscosity. Reduced viscosity decreases the friction experienced by gears which increases the useful torque, efficiency, and range of EVs. To achieve these desirable lubricant properties, various technologies can potentially be used for EV lubricant production. The incorporation of nanoparticles in lubricants has been shown to decrease friction and increase the thermal and oxidative stability required by electric motors. Thermal and oxidative stability can also be improved with additives and synthetic-based oils. In addition, bio-lubricants are being developed that will address the growing concerns over sustainability, biodegradability, and reduced toxicity. Although these advancements have worked in internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, a great amount of research still needs to be done to ascertain how they can be applied in EV technology. The successful development of effective EV lubricants will be a step towards a greener future and will enable EVs to dominate the transportation industry. This poster discusses the advancements that need to be made in lubricant technology, challenges faced in the field of EVs, and innovations that have the potential to yield ideal properties in EV lubricants for maximizing EV efficiency.

 
#160

View Poster
Here

The Future of Environmentally Friendly and Sustainable Lubricant Formulations

Lubricants have been, and continue to be, a vital tool in the multi-faceted field of chemical engineering. Their usage spans from the engine oils in planes that promote fuel efficiency to the hydraulic fluids in machinery that transmit power effectively; simply put, modern technology is highly dependent on lubricants. However, the increasing rate of depletion for the world’s crude oil reserves has sparked a renewed interest in developing highly functional, renewable, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly lubricants. While this would be an amazing ideal to strive for, the technical specifications for lubricants are already very demanding to begin with without considering extraneous environmental criteria such as eco-toxicological properties complicating matters further. As the regulations from organizations such as the US Environmental Protection Association (EPA) and the American Chemistry Council (ACC) continue to push the lubricant industry down this environmentally friendly path, new lubricant formulations need to be developed. This poster will outline the challenges the lubricant industry must overcome as the demand for an environmentally friendly product soars.